It’s mitten time again!

Yesterday a fantastic anthology of craftivism mittens and mitts popped up in my pattern highlights section on Ravelry.  It is a collection of designs called Join Hands, and as I was savouring the patterns, I realised that it was time for another post about great mitten patterns (previous posts include Merry Mittenmas!, A dozen great patterns for fingerless mitts, and Mittens!). This seems to be becoming an annual feature on the blog, one which I am more than happy to continue.  So, without further ado, here are my picks of the season.

We must do better by Dianna Walla

we must do better

© Dianna Walla

I like all of the patterns in the Join Hands pattern ebook, but this is one of my favorites.  I love anything Dianna Walla designs (she is a fantastic blogger as well; check her out here).  These mitts really speak to me, both for their meaning and for the great lines of the design and the very simple but bold patterning. The proceeds from the ebook will be split equally between the American Civil Liberties Union and the Southern Poverty Law Center, two worthy organisations!  The phrase “We must do better”, knitted around the cuffs, is taken from the book We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

Iznik by Barbara Gregory

iznik

Crissy Jarvis © Barbara Gregory

Barbara Gregory’s designs are nearly always winners in my book.  I love her use of colour and whimsy.  (I knit one of her sweaters which I blogged about here.)  She puts out great mitten patterns every year.  This year I was taken with the design called Iznik.  I am a big fan of tiles, and the Iznik tiles and pottery from Turkey are very distinctive and beautiful.  She uses duplicate stitch for the third colour, so these are not as difficult as they appear, using two-colour stranded knitting throughout.

Petronela Mittens by Anna Lipinska

petronela

© Anna Lipinska

This year I seem to be attracted to big, cosy mittens.  I have a cold right now, so perhaps that factored into my selection, but it seems to be a trend on this list.  These mittens are very spare but look like just the right thing to wear for a brisk winter walk.  In fact, these mittens are almost enough to make me wish to take a brisk winter walk, which is saying a lot.  I like these in natural colours but could imagine making them in almost any shade.  Make them for your teenagers and watch them not be able to text.

Herati by Sari Nordlund

herati

© Nicole Mlakar

I like almost anything from the Pom Pom Quarterly.  This pair of mittens really caught my eye (not hard to do with this sumptuous shot – all those beautiful reds and golds).  These are knit with Quince & Co Finch, a favorite yarn, and I just might have these very colours in my stash!  I hesitate to knit mittens without a gusset (see my post To gusset or not to gusset) but these have been circling around in my brain and could very well end up on my needles.

Black and White Mittens by Carolyn Vance

black and white mittens

© TKGA, 2017

These mittens are published in a journal called Cast On, The Educational Journal for Knitters, Winter 2017/18; it is published quarterly by The Knitting Guild Association, a non-profit organization.  This suggests that this pattern is educational; I just think it’s cool.  I am attracted to geometrical prints and also to black and white patterns. These are knit in sport weight yarn on tiny needles, to get a gauge of 10 stitches to the inch in pattern.  The design uses a technique called twined knitting – I don’t know it (I guess that is what makes this educational), but can also be knit with traditional stranded stockinette.

Lines Mittens by tincanknits

lines

© tincanknits

I love what tincanknits do with colour, but this pattern shows how great they are with natural shades as well.  I really like these mittens – I love how the grey and white play against each other, I love the geometry of the lines, and I especially love the photo.  If I had these, I would hang around on cliffs all day waiting for someone to photograph my hands artfully arranged against the rocks.  These are knit in a cashmere blend, by the way, which makes me want them even more.

Tveir Fingerless Gloves by Ella Gordon

tveir_medium2

© Ella Gordon

I had to include this very Christmas-y design here.  These fingerless gloves are so cheerful and pretty.   They make me think of eggnog and gingerbread and wrapping paper and Christmas tree ornaments.  It’s a very sweet pattern, from the Shetland Wool Week Annual 2017.

Pink Pine Pair by Nataliya Sinelshchikova

pink pine

© amirisu

These are fantastic mittens with a super interesting construction. I covet these, in the exact colours.  I want this pop of pink!  And then maybe I would make a pair with a pop of red!  Or a pop of orange! Or a pop of purple!  Maybe I need many pairs!   I have never heard of this designer and this is her only pattern on Ravelry, but if this is the first she is off to a good start.

I hope this post inspires you to knit a pair of mittens.  I believe there should be a design for everyone in this selection (including all of those on your gift list).  Happy knitting!

Mittens!

Shortly before Christmas last year, I published a post with great mitten patterns (you can find it here).  Last week, I received a lovely mitten pattern in the mail.  As part of her Seven Skeins Club, Kate Davies recently released this pattern, called Kokkeluri:

© Kate Davies Designs

© Kate Davies Designs

I think these are beautiful, and if I ever get my hands back to knttting shape, I plan to make a pair.  (I already have the yarn!)  This pattern is only available to subscribers of the Seven Skeins Club until its general release in 2016.  If you are not part of the Club, never fear!  I have another seasonal round-up of great mitten patterns for you here.

I just love these Medusa Mittens by Annie Watts.  It is one pair in a trio, which includes the Mitts of Sysiphus and the Pandora Mitts.  They are all good, but these are my favorites.

© Annie Watts

© Annie Watts

They can’t be properly appreciated without seeing the back (or the front as the case may be).  What would Medusa be without snakes?

© Annie Watts

© Annie Watts

While I love fun mittens, and I love colourful mittens, I also have a fondness for geometrical patterns, and love the spare lines and muted colours of these, Midtown by Spilly Jane.  She was inspired by the subway ventilation gratings in New York City.

© David Trudell

© David Trudell

My mitten post last year had a couple of red and white themed mittens.  This seems to be a favorite of mine, as witnessed by this pair, the Celtic Inspired Mittens, by Janet Welsh Knits.

© Janet Welsh Knits

© Janet Welsh Knits

The Melancholy Thistle pattern by Pinneguri is pretty in this green and white colourway, but make sure you check out the projects on Ravelry.  There aren’t too many yet, but the variations in the colourways are really striking.  Check them out.  Aren’t the thumbs fabulous?

© Jessica Silversaga

© Jessica Silversaga

Weeds by Lynn Manderville is a lovely pattern.  I find these really appealing; the colourwork is great but I especially love the cuffs.  I am a sucker for seed stitch, and this green is gorgeous.

© Lynn Manderville

© Lynn Manderville

I love these Telšiai Mittens by Donna Druchunas.  These are based on a pair of Lithuanian mittens knitted in the town of Telšiai, and photographed in a Lithuanian knitting pattern book from 1933 (details at Ravelry link above).  The original photo is in black and white, but I think this blue and yellow combination is fabulous.

© Donna Druchunas

© Donna Druchunas

I really love Metasequoia, by Kristen Kapur (what a great name, too!).  I’m not even sure why I find them so appealing but their simple folksiness with a touch of whimsy, is really great.

© Kirsten Kapur

© Kirsten Kapur

Last but not least, I ‘m crazy about the Calaveras Mittens by JennyPenny:

© JennyPenny

© JennyPenny

In case you’re not convinced, just tlook at the reverse side.

© JennyPenny

© JennyPenny

The weather is going to get cold and frosty any day (at least for us in the Northern Hemisphere).  It’s the perfect time to cast on a pair of mittens.  Enjoy!

Merry Mittenmas!

I was sitting around thinking about mitten patterns (as one does) and listening to Christmas carols.  My head filled in the following lyrics:

On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love gave to me

Twelve great mitten patterns…

So, without further ado, I present to you twelve great mitten patterns (in no particular order; all links are to Ravelry pattern pages.)

1. Newton’s Mittens, designed by Emily Bujold:

© Scienceteacher

© Scienceteacher

2. Deep in the Forest mittens, designed by Tuulia Samela:

by Tuulia

by Tuulia

3. Perfect Storm mittens, designed by Kimberly Voisin:

© Carrie Bostick Hoge

© Carrie Bostick Hoge

4. 4-11 Mittens, designed by Anna Zilboorg:

© sweatergoddess

© sweatergoddess

5. Paradoxical mittens, designed by Lucy Neatby:

by LucyN

by LucyN

6. Blomst mittens, designed by Tori Seierstad:

by Torirot

by Torirot

7. Wallpaper Mittens, designed by Veronik Avery:

by Veronik

by Veronik

8. Stay Puft mittens (Ghostbuster tribute), designed by Therese Sharp:

© Therese Sharp

© Therese Sharp

9. Golden Light Mittens, designed by Spilly Jane:

© SpillyJane

© SpillyJane

10. Freja mittens, designed by Emmy Petersson:

© Emmy Petersson

© Emmy Petersson

11. Lotus Mittens, designed by Heather Dessurud:

© hedda knits

© hedda knits

12. Fishbone Mittens, designed by Marit Trudvang:

by yarnjungle

by yarnjungle

Looking over this list, I can see a number of dominant themes:

  1. Colourwork.  Every single one of these patterns utilizes colourwork.  No Plain Jane mittens for me!
  2. Whimsy.  It is clear that I have a finely tuned sense of the ridiculous.
  3. Black and white geometrics.  Three out of twelve fall into this category; clearly, this is an appealing theme for me.

Happy Holidays!