Business Class Cowl

 

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I wanted to design a cowl for Doug that could be worn with a business suit.  Doug does a lot of business travel; he needed a cowl which would be very lightweight but warm, which could be easily slipped into a briefcase or bag, and which would look both professional and classy.  This cowl meets all of these requirements and has a subtle texture which looks great on both sides.  Whether you travel business class or economy, you will look classy in this cowl!

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Business Class Cowl by Kelly Sloan

Size: 47 x 9 inches, lightly blocked

Yarn: WOOLFOLK TYND, 100% wool, fingering weight, 2 skeins (cowl used approximately 420 yards).   The cowl pictured used the shade 08 Darkest Bronze.

Needles: US 4 (3.5mm) or size to obtain gauge

Gauge:  24 x 40, in pattern, lightly blocked

 

Pattern stitch (knit in the round):

Rounds 1-3:  *k2, p1* repeat to end

Round 4: purl all stitches

 

Cowl:  Cast on 282 stitches and join in the round being careful not to twist stitches.  Place marker at beginning of round.  Begin pattern stitch.  Repeat these four rounds of pattern until desired length, ending with a Round 3.  Cast off in pattern.

 

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Though any fingering weight wool would work, I highly recommend the WOOLFOLK TYND.  It is incredibly soft, and is light and lofty.  It is beautiful to work with and has wonderful drape.

Note: Although gauge is not crucial, the dimensions of the cowl will vary if your gauge differs from that stated.

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Wedgewood Mitts

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Happy New Year!  I hope that everyone is off to a good start for a great year!  I hate making New Year’s Resolutions because they rarely stick.  So, this time, I’ve made mine exceedingly simple:  Move more!  Procrastinate less!

For knitting resolutions, I want to experiment and explore and knit more things that Emma and I have designed.  So, on that note, and serendipitously checking the procrastinate less box, I bring you a free pattern here; my first design of the year.

Wedgewood Mitts by Kelly Sloan

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Yarn: Buachaille, 100% wool yarn by Kate Davies Designs, 35 grams of MC and 15 grams of CC; two skeins should (just) make two pairs of mittens if you reverse the main and contrast colours for the second pair.

In the photos, I have used Between Weathers (mid-blue) for the MC, and Ptarmigan (natural white) for the CC. This combination reminded me of Wedgewood china, thus the name of the pattern.

Gauge: 24×32 in stockinette, 28×32 (unblocked and unstretched) in corrugated ribbing

Needle: US 3 or size to obtain gauge

Notes on size and gauge: This pattern gives one size only (7.25” width) but can easily be adjusted to fit your hand. You can change the mitt size by changing the needle size, or you can adjust the number of stitches. The stitches must be a multiple of 4. (If you adjust the stitch number, then in Row 1 of the thumb gusset, knit half the stitches before placing the first marker.)   Knitters will also vary quite a bit on how tight their corrugated ribbing is compared to their stockinette, so my advice is to treat your first mitt as a gauge swatch: knit the cuff, and then try it on. If it is too tight, you can rip it out and start again with a larger needle size or simply cast on more stitches (in multiples of 4). Depending on the contrast between your stockinette gauge and your corrugated ribbing, you may need to decrease or increase some stitches for the body of the mitt: again, trying it on is always the best policy.

There is no left and right; both mitts are the same.

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Cuff: 

Using CC cast on 44 stitches, using the cast on method of your choice.  Join in the round and purl 2 rows.

Knit 14 rows in corrugated ribbing:  *K2 with MC, P2 with CC*, repeat to end

Next  row: With CC, knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches

With CC, purl 2 rows.  Break yarn.

Body:

With MC, knit  4 rows.

Begin thumb gusset:

Row 1: K22, pm, m1, pm, knit to end

Rows 2 and 3:  Knit

Row 4 (increase row):  K to marker, sm, m1, k to marker, m1, sm, knit to end

Repeat rows 2-4 until there are 13 stitches between the markers, then knit 2 rows.

Next row: Knit, transferring the 13 stitches between markers onto waste yarn.

Knit 15 rows.  Break yarn.

With CC, knit one row, purl two rows, and cast-off purl-wise.

Thumb: 

Transfer the 13 stitches from waste yarn back to needles. Rejoin MC and join in the round, picking up 2 stitches in the thumb gap. Be sure to place a marker beginning the start of the round.

Knit 4 rows. Break yarn.

With CC, knit 1 row, purl 2 rows, and bind off purl-wise.

Finishing: With a darning needle, weave in ends.  Wet block.

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Abbreviations:

CC – contrasting colour

K – knit

m1 – make 1 (Insert the left needle from front to back into the horizontal strand between the two stitches: Knit the stitch through the back loop.)

MC – main colour

P – purl

pm – place marker

sm – slip marker